Bride

Bride

Bride

Historical notes on bridal gown or wedding dress. (Cit.Wikipedia)

Weddings performed during and immediately after the Middle Ages, especially among the most prolific social classes, represented much more than the mere union of two people. These were political or economic interests, so the bride was not only the herself, but the whole family, and for this reason had to appear in the best possible light. They were therefore chosen to dress in bright colors and precious materials. It was not uncommon for a bride to wear velvet or silk dresses and often even fur. In the less prosperous social classes, brides were trying their best to "copy" the bridal brides of rich families. Over the centuries, the tendency to dress the bride has remained, to the best that the family economic condition could allow . There are currently bridal gowns covering a wide range of boutiques and boutiques specializing in the sale of only bridal gowns.

Although in the mid-nineteenth century the habit of wearing long and wide dresses, similar to those in vogue of the Victorian era, has become widespread, in fact the wedding dress style is generally very fashionable in the period. For example, in the twenties the brides dressed in short front dresses, with a long traverse, often coupled with a cloche hat. Traditionally, the wedding dress is white, although it is possible to span in a range of colors, including shades such as ivory, cream, ecru and so on. One of the first women to dress in white was Maria Stuarda when she married Francis II of France. In his case, however, it was not a tradition but a precise choice of the queen.

The white dress became a very popular option among the brides around 1840, after the marriage of Queen Victoria with Alberto of Saxony-Coburg-Gotha. The queen wore a white dress for the event, adorned with some lace. The official photo of the wedding was widespread, and the queen's dress was adopted by many brides. The tradition of the white dress has been handed down to this day, although it should be pointed out that before the wedding of Queen Victoria, it was possible to choose for any color suit, except black (funeral color) and red (associated with prostitutes ). The mistake that is made today is to consider bordeaux (very common) color as a symbol of sin. The only exception was the nineteenth-century Finnish brides wearing dark or black dresses. Later, the conviction that the choice of white color represented virginity was widespread, though blue was associated with purity. Currently the white dress is simply intended as the most traditional choice for marriage, and not necessarily as a symbol of purity.


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